TPN Podcasts for Week 34, 2019

This week on TPN: 

On our podcasts this week we talked about the rise of Kim Il Sung in North Korea, the first Renaissance man, the Aussie economy and whether or not the value of the dollar is closely related to a coming economic collapse.

 

 

Meanwhile in the North, the Soviets chose Kim Il Sung to be their hand-picked President. Unlike Rhee, who had spent most of the last 35 years of Japanese occupation chilling in Hawaii, Kim had spent his life fighting the Japanese occupation, first as a guerrilla, then as a Major in the Soviet Red Army. But the actual architect of the North Korean state was Soviet General Terentii Shtykov.

The first written work of art theory, produced during the Renaissance was “De Pictura”, or “On Painting”, written in 1435 by Leon Battista Alberti but not published until 1450, in which he explained the science behind linear perspective.
He was a humanist author, artist, architect, poet, priest, linguist, philosopher, mathematician and cryptographer. He also wrote the first autobiography since St Augustine.
A true polymath and the first Renaissance Man, who inspired every Renaissance artist who followed him.

Tony dials in from Ireland this week and brings me up to date on his visits to whisky distilleries in Scotland and his out-of-body experience playing the Old Course at St Andrews. We also talk a little about investing and he how he feels like “I’ve seen this show before”, meaning the current bull run hype. We discuss how our dummy portfolio is going (mostly in the green except for Myer) and for our QAV Club members, we have a discussion about Mortgage Choice (MOC).

TPN Podcasts for Week 30, 2019

This week on TPN: 

On our podcasts this week we talked about how the Berlin Airlift was more of a propaganda win for the US, rather than an actual exercise in humanitarianism; how Poggio Bracciolini hated his four years in England and thought of the Vatican as a “lie factory”; why Iran’s claims to have arrested 17 spies working for the CIA sound credible; and some of the history of golf, especially as it relates to St Andrews in Scotland, as well as the current bull market hype. 

Click on the titles below to go to the episode.

 

 

As part of their plan to re-build Germany, the USA secretly released a new currency, the Deutsche Mark, printed in New York, to replace the old Reichsmark. Frustrated at how the US, UK and France were re-building their zones of Germany without first reaching an agreement with the USSR, on June 24 1948, Stalin erected a physical blockade (or, as he preferred to call it, “a defensive measure”) around West Berlin to prevent all traffic from Trizonia from entering into the city. The response of the US/UK was a massive airlift – an incredibly bold move, basically threatening Stalin to shoot their planes down and start another war. Luckily he chose not to do that, and instead backed down and ended the blockade. Meanwhile, Truman signed National Security Council document No. 30 (NSC-30) officially known as the “United States Policy on Atomic Warfare” – which made it official that the US would continue to use nuclear weapons as part of their arsenal.

In 1419, a couple of years after he lost his papal secretary job and discovered Lucretius, Poggio did what everyone does when they are shit out luck and scraping the bottom of the barrel. He moved to England. He accepted the post of secretary to Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester and uncle of Henry V. Poggio hoped to find some intelligent life in England and maybe a valuable ancient manuscript. He was disappointed on both counts. So in 1422 he returned to work for the Vatican again, or, as he liked to call it, “The Lie Factory”. Meanwhile he kept trying to get Nicky to send him a copy of Lucretius so he could read it. Once back in Rome, he starts to make money – and illegitimate children. LOTS of illegitimate children.

On this week’s news show we look the recent headlines concerning Iran – their arrest of 17 CIA spies, and the seizure of oil tankers by both the British and the Iranians. Who and what should we believe?

Tony dials in from Ireland this week and brings me up to date on his visits to whisky distilleries in Scotland and his out-of-body experience playing the Old Course at St Andrews. We also talk a little about investing and he how he feels like “I’ve seen this show before”, meaning the current bull run hype. We discuss how our dummy portfolio is going (mostly in the green except for Myer) and for our QAV Club members, we have a discussion about Mortgage Choice (MOC).

TPN Podcasts for Week 29, 2019

This week on TPN: 

On our podcasts this week we talked about the background to the Berlin blockade; how one Florentine scholar in the early 1400s taught the city how to be cultured; how Sejanus went in a single day from being the second most powerful man in Rome to being torn apart; and the value of Woolworths shares.

Click on the titles below to go to the episode.

 

 

The fault of the Berlin Blockade is often laid at the feet of Stalin. But the truth is a little more complicated.

By 1948, the situation in Germany was still complicated. The Four Powers (USA, USSR, UK, France) in control of Germany couldn’t agree on a path forwards. Russia and France wanted to keep Germany weak. The USA and UK wanted to build it back up into a European economic power. And they wanted it to be firmly in the capitalism economic bloc. So the USA and UK took a dump on the principles of the Allied Control Commission and just made decisions regarding the future of the three-quarters of Germany under their control. This is what lead Stalin to stop them from entering Berlin, which was fully within the Soviet zone of occupation.

Nicky the Nickster was one of the most influential people in Florence in the early 1400s. He was the unofficial minister of culture and probably the guy who influenced Cosimo de Medici to support the humanists and artists. Obsessed with antiquity, he spent his entire family fortune on buying ancient manuscripts, sculptures and other artefacts. He was also a master of Latin and quite the dilettante. When he died, he had built the largest private library of ancient books in Italy. Early German printers used his cursive handwriting as the basis for italic typesetting.

Sejanus decided to remove the next in line of Germanicus’ heirs, Drusus, and finally married Livia Julia, the widow of the other Drusus, son of Tiberius. He also became Tiberius’ official partner in power – in 31CE Tiberius took his fifth consulship, with Seianus as his colleague. But before the year 31 would come to a close, Sejanus and all his family were dead, his statues thrown down, his name erased from the public records.

As Tony was too busy evaluating the quality of Scotland’s golf courses and single malts to get on the phone with me this week, our show consists of a checklist analysis we did in Sydney in early June about Woolworths (WOW). This is the companion analysis to last week’s show about Coles Group, so you can see how two similar business compare in the checklist.